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What the President's New Immigration Executive Order Really Means

Camille Bradbury
Legal Content Specialist

We’ve received hundreds of messages/questions about President Trump's immigration tweet posted earlier this week and empathize with all immigrants, employers, and family members that have dealt with anxiety as a result of this announcement, especially in the midst of dealing with the pandemic.

However, what appeared to be a daunting "suspending immigration" announcement or "Proclamation Suspending Entry of Immigrants" actually carried little weight. The President's immigration executive order grabbed headlines but the practical impact was negligible.

Breakdown of the executive order:

The 60-day restriction only affects those outside of the United States who are pursuing permanent residence ("Green Card") at a consulate abroad. In other words, the 60-day restriction only affects those outside of the United States who are pursuing, and have not yet received, an immigrant visa stamp in their passport for permanent residence ("Green Card") at a consulate abroad, and “do not have an official travel document other than a visa." Consulates have been closed anyways so this is really a non-issue, especially for the world of employment-based immigration.

Those who already hold Legal Permanent Resident ("LPR") status, or are pending their LPR status, can still enter on Advance Parole travel documents and are not affected.

Based on what we know, there will not be a complete halt on immigration, and this will not impact those entering the country on a temporary basis (e.g. H-1B, L-1, TN, etc.) This change is negligible as routine visa services have been suspended since March 20th, and most borders are closed for non-essential travel through mid-May.

We'll continue to monitor and provide updates as they become available.

Content in this publication is not intended as legal advice, nor should it be relied on as such. For additional information on the issues discussed, consult a Bridge-affiliated partner attorney or another qualified legal professional.

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