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Pitfalls When Renewing Your Green Card

Bridge Team Member

Common Pitfalls

We outline a few of the common risks to consider avoiding when starting the process for renewal of a Green Card.

Criminal History

If you have any criminal violations since you were approved for your Green Card, you should first consult with an immigration lawyer before you fill out any documents with USCIS or do any international traveling. As part of USCIS processes, thorough background checks are performed on all applicants wishing to renew their green cards. If the background check reveals that you have a criminal history that would make you deportable under the certain rules, USCIS may choose to place you in removal proceedings.

Cost

Current fee is around $450 every ten years. This cost adds up fast once you include the filling fees that have increased over the years.

Limited Travel

During the time that it takes to process your renewal application, it is not advised to travel outside the U.S as you significantly risk your chance to re-enter.

Hostile Sentiments

There is a very good chance that your green card will be denied when it comes up for renewal if you are openly sympathetic towards terrorist groups.

Living Somewhere Else

If you do not reside in the U.S for at least 6 months of the year then immigration officials often deny your request to renew your green card.

Taxes

Failure to pay state of federal income tax is also ground for the federal government to deny your request.

Lying

If during the renewal process immigration learns that you have made misleading or fraudulent statements on your green card application, it can revoke your green card or refuse its renewal. Remember, honesty is seriously the best policy.

Though green card renewal is not necessarily something to be worried about, it is important to know some of the pitfalls in the process. Should you have any questions about how this impacts your business or employees, please do not hesitate to reach out to us.

Green Card Guide

Content in this publication is not intended as legal advice, nor should it be relied on as such. For additional information on the issues discussed, consult a Bridge-affiliated partner attorney or another qualified legal professional.


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